With much of Europe now heading into, or already in, lockdown and peoples general fear of crowded areas. Most gyms worldwide are either closed or people might be considering spending more time at home. However, that doesn’t mean training has to take a hit if you don't have a luxury home gym.

Covered in this blog

  • An understanding of Time Under Tension (TUT)
    • Example exercise
  • An understanding of impact training
    • Example exercise
  • An understanding of isolated leg training
    • Example exercise

Woman completing a squat following the time under tension method

Time under tension

Time under tension is essentially slow-paced movements of exercises that would usually be done under weight, such as the squat. Slowing the movement down not only allows the body to concentrate and focus on the movement involved, but also allows the body to recruit many smaller muscles that don’t necessarily get recruited during regular heavy exercise. This means they are a great exercise if someone struggles with muscular recruitment. They are also handy to slot in to make sure every muscle is aligned and balanced.

Here's an example: when you squat, focusing on TUT, think about muscles like the quads (front of your legs) and glutes (bum) working, focus on these during the movement and you will begin to feel them work.

Try: 3 sets of 10 squats. But take 10 seconds to lower yourself down and again to stand back up. Have 60s rest between circuits.

Man completing a box jump

Impact training

Impact work is great. It reduces the risk of injury from repetitive strain and conditions the body for long periods of the same movement; exactly what cycling is all about. Try some impact work at home and you should see less injuries in the knees, hips and ankles. It can also help alleviate any pain in these areas when running and riding.

An example of this would be box jumps, or stair jumps if you are at home.

Try: Complete 5 sets of 5 with 45-60s rest.

Woman completing some isolated leg training

Isolated leg training

Isolated leg training, also known as single leg training, is one of the greatest methods of training at home as it instantly makes an exercise harder.

I have worked with athletes who can squat over 150kg’s but put them on a pistol squat and they have no chance of completing the movement. Single leg work is tough. Especially when you remove balancing aids like kettlebells and barbells.

Try: Box squats are a great single leg exercise as well as influencing stability and strength they also have an emphasis on progression. You can lower the height of the box you use until you don’t need one and can perform a pistol squat with ease.

Give them a try during lockdown and see how much you can progress.

Bodyweight exercise is a fantastic way to increase your fitness, iron out injuries and focus purely on movement. Which as athletes is something I think we should all do from time to time instead of purely focusing on weight lifted.

 

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About The Author: Adam Copley

Adam is a self-employed coach based in Sheffield, UK. Alongside this he is an avid cyclist and competes in cross country mountain biking across the UK. He has raced Cyclocross during the winter and is also a huge lover of road cycling. While he's not working on his business, he is usually out on two wheels getting fitter, and enjoying the fresh air and many climbs in the peak district.

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